Posts Tagged ‘Judaism’

Taken by the author at the 2009 Parliament of the World's Religions in Melbourne, Australia.

Choice and Safety: Required Ingredients for Interfaith Progress

Classic “contact theory” predicts that diverse societies automatically bring about tolerance. I argued against this idea here when I discussed how proximity generally exacerbates the anxiety of difference, and fails to disconfirm negative stereotypes when people see—but do not understand—their differences. If your goal is increasing tolerance and civic cooperation, it is not enough just […]

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interfaithdialogue

St. Mary’s Shabbat

Having been raised in an observant Italian Catholic household, I understand the importance of family, food, holidays, and motherly guilt. This week marks the 10th anniversary of my conversion to Judaism, a religion which also prides itself on a strong connection to family, food, holidays, and motherly guilt. While the choice to align myself with […]

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William Holman Hunt: The Scapegoat, 1854.

Reflections on Scapegoating

We are pleased to be sharing, over the coming weeks, a series of four reflection pieces on the State of Formation visit to the United Stated Holocaust Memorial Museum this spring. Each one is a collaborative piece from two of our Contributing Scholars. Lauren Seganos A few weeks ago there was an opinion piece in […]

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"Coloured hebrew letters". Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coloured_hebrew_letters.JPG#/media/File:Coloured_hebrew_letters.JPG

Praying in Hebrew, Speaking in Tongues

The other day I was meeting with a friend and local Pentecostal minister (let’s call him “Diego”) when someone we mutually knew (let’s call him “Sam”) dropped by to say hello. After a few short pleasantries it was clear that our friend was struggling. He was looking for some spiritual guidance and when Diego asked […]

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Medieval mikveh in Speyer, Germany

When I Entered A Holy Covenant: A Dvar Torah on Parshat Shmini (Lev. 9:1-11:47)

Four years ago this week–at least by reckoning of the Hebrew calendar–my friend proudly displayed to me a cake she had made for a party I was hosting. “Today, you are a man,” it declared. She was excited to celebrate my “Boozy Bat Mitzvah,” a party celebrating not my actual Bat Mitzvah, but my conversion […]

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1024px-Yahrtzeit_candle

Walking Together Through the “Valley of the Shadow of Death”

It seems almost a cliché to be sitting here writing about death, here in Boston with eight feet of snow pressing in on all sides, the bitter winter winds howling just outside my windows. But if seemingly endless winter can inspire the Russians to create such darkly beautiful literature, perhaps it can work its magic […]

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Image courtesy of Washington D.C. Library

Invoking The Power From Within During the Season of Advent

Patience is not a quality that I demonstrate very well, but I can respect the holy merit of patient waiting. Advent is the season where Christians wait, long, and prepare for the birth of their Messiah, Jesus Christ. In Judaism, we too long for the Messiah, who has historically been described as a prominent political or […]

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Eye w-flame

With my eyes I can take everything from you: Rededicating ourselves to seeing Black lives

Chanukah is a festival of lights, which makes it an opportunity to reflect on what we see and how we see it. The rituals of Chanukah are all about light and seeing: we’re commanded to kindle Chanukah lights each night; we’re commanded to enjoy their light; we’re commanded to spend time appreciating their glow. Chanukah […]

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Mural_on_Israeli_wall

Just Another Brick in the Barrier…..

I knew Rabbi Twersky. We weren’t best buddies, or drinking pals, or even very close, but I considered him a friend. I met him several times in Boston and in Israel and always found him to be a great giver of Torah and a pleasant man who loved the Jewish people. The horrific events surrounding […]

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Author: Sharon Azran/B’Tselem. Creative Commons license, from Wikimedia Commons. Source: http://www.btselem.org/photoblog/20140115_hebron

“There is no such thing as Palestine!”–Dispatch from Palestine

“You can’t teach me anything about Europeans,” once commented the deputy mayor of Jerusalem. Europeans had killed his father. “You can’t teach me anything about Palestinians.” Palestinians had killed his mother. The deputy mayor embodied a common sentiment among Zionists, many of whom had suffered dear losses to one or another enemy of the Jewish […]

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