Posts Tagged ‘Peace’

Photo taken by the author at the 2009 Parliament of the World's Religions.

What Is the Unity of “Unity in Diversity”?

Notwithstanding the prizing of diversity, there IS some unified bottom line to interfaith dialogue. Nonviolent behavior is the basis for “unity in diversity.” Behavior is a category about which all parties participating in a dialogue must actually be on the same page. A behavioral covenant of nonviolence is necessary to contain and maintain an interfaith engagement, […]

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taken by the author on December 5th, 2009 at the Parliament for the Word's Religions in Melbourne, Austalia.

Romantic Distance vs. Vexing Proximity: the difficulty of real up-close interfaith encounters

My research on interreligious dialogue and engagement has reinforced an old cliché: absence makes the heart grow fonder. When two people are distant from each other, it is easy to idealize each other. It is easy to recall them enshrouded in mists and to dream of an incandescent, ecstatic reunion. It is easy to gleefully […]

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By Barbaricino (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fa/Libro_di_Mormon.JPG

On Irreconcilable Differences: My Interreligious Dialogue with Mormon Missionaries

Since I’m conducting field research on interfaith dialogue in Rome, I thought it would be an important part of my participant-observation to embark upon a dialogue. I met some Mormon sisters conducting missions in Italy, and we gathered on three different occasions to trade our stories, religious commitments, and to talk about our faith. I grew […]

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religious hands

Religious Literacy for a Fearful and Violent World

In February, I had the great pleasure of co-presenting a workshop at the DC Interfaith Leaders Summit with Amber Hacker, the Alumni Director for Interfaith Youth Core. In our workshop we encouraged attendees to cultivate a personal theology or ethic for interfaith cooperation, specifically with a focus on public interfaith engagement. Following the workshop, I […]

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By Sri Chinmoy.org (http://www.srichinmoy.org/interfaith) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

What Can Interfaith Dialogue Really Do? Part 3 of 3

Read Part I here, and Part II here. When I ate lunch with the rabbi he inveighed against interfaith dialogue and its inability to reach or transform the minds of those who are closed to dialogue. He said, “Interfaith activists say one thing and they do another—they preach transformation and tolerance, but they are already […]

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By Sri Chinmoy.org (http://www.srichinmoy.org/interfaith) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

What Can Interfaith Dialogue Really Do? Part 2 of 3

Read Part I here. At lunch after Purim, I heard the rabbi criticize interfaith projects for being “just another religious group.” I reflected on the irony of a religious clergy person dismissing the bonding function of the interfaith society. If indeed the interfaith society becomes a “religion” of its own, this is no reason to […]

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SoF Logo

Interfaith Dialogue and Identity Formation

Interfaith dialogue is of increasing importance on a daily basis in our current international social, political and economic order. This can be seen in the current interfaith groups that are gathering together in Baltimore as well as other places around the United States to protest police brutality as well as other social issues. Discussing how religious traditions relate to the social order in the pursuit of justice is just one of the many aspects of interfaith dialogue. As cultures and religions come into ever closer contact with each other, understanding the ways in which both one’s own religious identity and that of other people living in the same area inform and shape identity and aids in the creation of mutual understanding and fellowship between people of different backgrounds.

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A huge and diverse group of South African citizens and residents rally at the Africa Unite Peace March on April 16, 2015.

Privilege, Peace, and What South African Violence Has to Say to the World

Recently, a colleague of mine related the story of how she posed this interesting question to her college students: “Can peace exist when poverty remains?” As the facilitator of a project the students are conducting in an impoverished part of town, she felt ill at ease with her own relative financial comfort. At that moment, […]

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WASHINGTON, USA - APRIL 22: Hundreds of people march through the streets of Baltimore to seek justice for the death for Freddie Gray who died from injuries suffered in Police custody in Baltimore, USA on April 22, 2015. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Choosing Sides in Baltimore

Like so many cities and communities over the past year that have come to our national attention, Baltimore is suffering. But what is happening on the streets of Baltimore is different from what is being portrayed across the country. Watching the news, I feel as though I’m meant to pick a side – either for peace, […]

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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AZero-tolerance.jpg

By unidentified [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

How Do We Tolerate the Intolerant?

What do tolerant people do with the intolerant? We tolerate them. We ignore them. We insult them. We try to change them:        By explaining.        By demonstrating.        By oppressing. We rationalize their existence: People disinterested in interfaith dialogue are ignorant, uncultured, or disengaged. ISIS is not really Islamic […]

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