Posts Tagged ‘pluralism’

English: Walaja Barrier 2011. Author Wickey-nl. Creative Commons license. 31 March 2014. Source: Own work, based on http://www.ochaopt.org/documents/ocha_opt_the_closure_map_2011_12_21_bethlehem.pdf, published by United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHAoPt). http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Walaja_Barrier_2011.jpg

“You are an ambassador”–Dispatch from Palestine

We drive along the barbed electric fence that surrounds the Israeli settlement of Har Gilo.  We are headed to the Walajah valley of the Palestinian territory. The valleys are deep and lush with pine trees and olive groves, steppes cut into the hillsides with round white stones. The land here has been largely confiscated by […]

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Thanksgiving Just For Christians?

Several friends and I have debated the nature of Thanksgiving for years. My friends contend that it is a Christian holiday. I disagree. Thanksgiving is in no way intrinsically religious. Of course, not all Christians agree with these particular Christian friends of mine. I imagine many would be surprised to find the proposition even open […]

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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AJewish_Settlement_Police.jpg. Source: Yair Malachi, circa 1942

The Beginning of a Settlement — Dispatch from Palestine

Mahmoud’s family lives one Palestinian hill over from a newly-forming illegal Jewish settlement. Six Jewish settlers arrived about a year ago with tents and made a primitive campsite. All year they prayed on the hill in religious pilgrimage. All settlements start this way. The original owner has a claim on this land and papers originating […]

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Taken by author Jenn Lindsay in Palestine

“Come and see, then go and tell”–Dispatch from Palestine

The Tent of Nations is an organic farm on a long narrow strip of Palestinian land that has held its deed since 1917, through four occupations: Turkish, British, Jordanian, and Israeli. It is placed in the middle of a circle of 5 Israeli settlements. The farmers mark the last clash with Israeli military forces in […]

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Bringing Interfaith Dialogue from Pakistan to the United States

Managing Editor’s note: all Contributing Scholars begin writing by answering the following question as their first post: Why are you committed to building relationships with those from different religious or ethical traditions? Their answer to this question is below. I grew up in an unexpectedly interfaith environment, something that most people living in Muslim majority […]

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Maurycy Gottlieb [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

An Improvised Family: Yom Kippur with Rome’s Progressive Jews

Normally people do not go to Rome to refrain from eating. But it was Yom Kippur, and I was on my way to afternoon services at Beth Hillel, Rome’s new progressive Jewish community. My long walk to the Beth Hillel service on the Janiculum Hill started on the banks of the Tiber River. In Piazza Navona […]

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Making Space for Everyone

Managing Editor’s note: all Contributing Scholars begin writing by answering the following question as their first post: Why are you committed to building relationships with those from different religious or ethical traditions? Their answer to this question is below. Although I was raised in a mixed Christian family (Methodist, Southern Baptist, Roman Catholic), I never […]

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By Wikipedia Loves Art participant "shooting_brooklyn" [CC-BY-SA-2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

When in Rome, Do as the Progressive Roman Jews Do

I was late to Rosh Hashanah services at Beth Hillel, Rome’s new progressive Jewish community. I meant to leave my apartment at 6pm but I scooted out the door by 6:45pm, realizing that the mistake would cost me 22 euros in cab fare. On the way up the Janiculum Hill I remarked how beautiful the […]

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Interfaith Education on the Playground

Managing Editor’s note: all Contributing Scholars begin writing by answering the following question as their first post: Why are you committed to building relationships with those from different religious or ethical traditions? Their answer to this question is below. My first interfaith friendship developed when I was an eight-year-old third grader living in a small-town […]

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This image is the logo for the North American Interfaith Network.

Intergenerational Interfaith

Last month I attended the North Atlantic Interfaith Network (NAIN) Connect in Detroit, Michigan. The history of interfaith cooperation was incredible in that city. I was amazed at the established interfaith relationships. I watched as individuals who had been friends for years, some for decades, reunite to talk about and share their city of Detroit. […]

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