Posts Tagged ‘Scriptural Reasoning’

Becoming Aware of the Religious Other

I lead a scriptural reasoning group at the University of Toronto that has an open door policy. That means in any given week I do not know who will attend and who will not.  It usually means a regular cohort will show up supplemented by newcomers from week to week.  Because our purpose in meeting […]

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Experiencing Islam: An Interview with Homayra Ziad, PhD

In January, Hebrew College and Andover Newton Theological School offered for the first time a joint winter seminar on Islam for rabbinical, cantorial and ministerial students. This one-week intensive course, “Experiencing Islam,” was led by Homayra Ziad, assistant professor of religion at Trinity College. Following her time on our hilltop campus, Ziad spoke with the […]

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800px-Koran

What is Holy to Others

I do not pretend to understand how an asinine video like “The Innocence of Muslims” can drive crowds to violent and even murderous anger.  Many commentators insist that the ultimate cause is not religion, but, perhaps, local politics, Western imperialism, or other political grievances.  Without denying the truth in these claims, my own suspicion is […]

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Getting Stuck in Clay: An Interfaith Reflection

This post was originally published on Huffington Post Religion. This is my first trip to Europe. I’ve had the chance to rent a bike and tour around the beautiful English countryside that surrounds Madingly, a small town (there is only a few homes, a pub, town hall and a church) right outside of Cambridge, England. […]

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“Are you a good Muslim or a bad Muslim?”

The fact that this question could be asked OUT LOUD to a GUEST of a Christian Church demonstrates a deep and pervasive understanding, in the status quo culture of the United States, that expressions of Islamophobia are not taboo, but actually to be expected.

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Come… read my sacred texts as if they were yours…

In an earlier post, I offered a reflection on the types of inter-religious encounters that, although often well intentioned, tend to be reductive and ultimately unhelpful in the development of inter-religious dialogue. This does not mean I have given up on the such dialogue, on the contrary I believe it is one of the most […]

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